Sharing Buddhist Spirituality Stories

Tibetan Hip Hop

Enjoy some Tibetan Hip Hop music Learn more about these performers as well as get all the song lyrics at this post "New Generation" – Hip Hop Music Video from Amdo on High Peaks Pure Earth. Read More @ Source

Tibetan Tantric Overtone Chant

Nestor Kornblum sings "Deep Voice" overtone chant with monks of the Gaden Shartse -Tawon Kangtsen Monastery on their 2007 tour of Spain. This form of chanting produces a "one voice chord" of 3 or more sounds from one single voice. It is called Tantric because it balances the masculine and feminine aspects of one's energy system.

Video Rating: 4 / 5



Video: Watch “My Reincarnation” on PBS Thursday

We've talked about the fascinating documentary My Reincarnation before, and now PBS' documentary series POV (Point of View) is kicking off its 25th season with a screening of the film, which follows the life and teachings of Tibetan Dzogchen master Chögyal Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche. It airs on most PBS stations at 10 p.m. on Thursday, June 21.

Filmed over 20 years, Jennifer Fox's documentary follows Namkhai Norbu's long teaching career, and his relationship with his Italian-born son Yeshi. Namkhai Norbu and his followers believe Yeshi is the reincarnation of Namkhai Norbu's own master, and expect him to follow in his father's footsteps. Yeshi, though, wants to live a normal Western life in Italy. Click through to watch a trailer for the film.

My Reincarnation will be shown on PBS' POV on Thursday, June 21, at 10 p.m. Check here for local TV listings. Also, Chögyal Namkhai Norbu is touring the United States for a series of teachings and retreats this summer; click here for his schedule.

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Taking the Practice Seriously

Shambhala SunSpace blogger Jill S. Schneiderman noticed an interesting article in the New York Times yesterday. And she wasn't the only one; James Atlas' "Buddhists' Delight" is currently the most-emailed story on the Times site. (And interestingly enough, the Washington Post published an American-Buddhism piece yesterday, too.) Here Schneiderman responds to Atlas's piece.
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Tengboche Buddhist monastery, Nepal (via Creative Commons)

Yesterday I read "Buddhists' Delight," an opinion piece in the Sunday New York Times by James Atlas, a long-time literary journalist who has written for the New Yorker and published a biography of Saul Bellow. In the piece Atlas describes four days he spent at a Buddhist meditation center "in retreat, from a frenetic Manhattan life." It's obvious from the essay that Atlas brought "beginner's mind" to the retreat and his report of this first encounter with Buddhist meditation is pretty insightful. Atlas' piece is a good introduction to the experience and I intend to give it to friends who are contemplating the possibility of sitting a multi-day retreat. Nonetheless, as experienced meditators know, there's more to meditation than beginners may realize.

So although it's a bit outside my usual bailiwick of earth science and dharma, I wanted to add to Atlas' observations from my position as a professional educator who is convinced that the practice of meditation is not only powerful but crucial to the rehabilitation of a society and planet in critically ill condition.  Atlas recognizes that meditation is an important tool for individuals trying to cope with the insane state of our world; he even notes the heft of Engaged Buddhism.

While sitting this morning I heard the carillon ring the early morning hour and I felt grateful, as I always do, to the monastic traditions that created the institution of the Monastery, the precursor to the modern University. Though most universities today have lost the spiritual dimension that once accompanied the educational mission of the Monastery, as an educator today, I aspire to reclaim the spiritual as a legitimate dimension of higher education.

As a regular practitioner and frequent retreatant at the Garrison Institute, I have experienced the transformational power of meditation that Atlas reports having sensed while he was on retreat in Vermont. Though as a beginner in the practice he may not realize it, Atlas has tapped into what multitudes of more experienced meditators know: meditation transforms minds and lives.

In "The University" a chapter in his book The Great Work: Our Way Into the Future, Ecotheologian Thomas Berry  admonishes readers that universities should "reorient the human community toward a greater awareness that the human exists, survives, and becomes whole only within the single great community of the planet Earth. " The bells ringing in the carillon of the Vassar College Chapel every hour remind me of this; the bells validate my impulse to teach meditation as a tool for societal rehabilitation.

Read more from Jill S. Schneiderman here.

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Heart Sutra (Music by Imee Ooi) - Lyrics Sanskrit and English

Video Rating: 5 / 5



Two Streams Zen: AnRyuJi, a new Zen center, opens in Westhampton, Massachusetts

Photo: twostreamszen.org

Ryumon H.G. Baldoquin semei and Catherine Araku Hondorp sensei have opened their second Zen temple in their home of Westhampton, Massachusetts — their first location, known as ShinJin Temple, is in nearby Northampton. AnRyuJi opened its doors earlier this month at 263 Main Road. Combined, the community of the two centers is being called Two Streams Zen.

The new location, according to the Daily Hampshire Gazette, "includes a Zen garden surrounded by woods divided by a small artificial stream, now offers regular meditation classes and occasional Zen multi-day retreats." Hondorp (a dharma successor of Pat Enkyo O'Hara roshi) serves as the Guiding Teacher of ShinJin Temple, and Baldoquin (a dharma successor of Zenkei Blanche Hartman) serves as Guiding Teacher of AnRyuJi.

 

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Safe word

Domestic relationships of all sorts might work a lot better by having a safeword in case an argument starts to hurt someone too much. To disrespect a safeword would be grounds to dissolve the relationship. It's got to be that … Continue reading Read More @ Source

A Teaching From Zen Master Jinen

This is the first in a series of teachings by my teacher, Zen master Jinen-san. *English subtitles with this video (Click CC). If you liked this, you may enjoy www.youtube.com www.themystictraveller.com

Video Rating: 4 / 5



“Samaya,” a multimedia Buddhist performance piece, premieres in New York next week

Samaya, a multimedia music and performance piece inspired by the images and energy of Buddhist Tantra, will be performed at the La Sala Experimental Music Space in Brooklyn from June 28 to July 1.

Blending contemporary music with movement, live vocal performances in English and Tibetan, and projected imagery and animation, Samaya is inspired by writer and director Harry Einhorn's visits to Tibetan monasteries in India, where he was struck by how performing arts are integrated into religious practice.

"My goal is to bring this type of embodied and celebratory performance to the wider western culture, and inject some pure dharma into the experimental theater scene in New York City and the West in general; not just for practitioners in a center, but for general audiences as well," Einhorn said.

The music in Samaya was written by Einhorn and Philippe Treuille. This is their third collaboration — their most recent production, Heart Sutra, was performed at venues around New York City, including the Rubin Museum. This time, Einhorn and Treuille are joined by motion-graphics artist Peyton Skyler.

Samaya will be performed three nights only — Thursday, June 28 at 8PM; Friday, June 29 at 8PM; and Sunday, July 1 at 2PM at La Sala, at 53 N 3rd St. in Brooklyn. Tickets are available here; admission is $ 10 for students and artists and $ 12 for general admission. For more information about Samaya, visit the production's website and blog.

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ช็อคโกแลต Chocolate - Rooftop Fight Scene 5

Zin and Zen enters the Tiger's den.

Video Rating: 4 / 5



“Samaya,” a multimedia Buddhist performance piece, premieres in New York next week

Samaya, a multimedia music and performance piece inspired by the images and energy of Buddhist Tantra, will be performed at the La Sala Experimental Music Space in Brooklyn from June 28 to July 1.

Blending contemporary music with movement, live vocal performances in English and Tibetan, and projected imagery and animation, Samaya is inspired by writer and director Harry Einhorn's visits to Tibetan monasteries in India, where he was struck by how performing arts are integrated into religious practice.

"My goal is to bring this type of embodied and celebratory performance to the wider western culture, and inject some pure dharma into the experimental theater scene in New York City and the West in general; not just for practitioners in a center, but for general audiences as well," Einhorn said.

The music in Samaya was written by Einhorn and Philippe Treuille. This is their third collaboration — their most recent production, Heart Sutra, was performed at venues around New York City, including the Rubin Museum. This time, Einhorn and Treuille are joined by motion-graphics artist Peyton Skyler.

Samaya will be performed three nights only — Thursday, June 28 at 8PM; Friday, June 29 at 8PM; and Sunday, July 1 at 2PM at La Sala, at 53 N 3rd St. in Brooklyn. Tickets are available here; admission is $ 10 for students and artists and $ 12 for general admission. For more information about Samaya, visit the production's website and blog.

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mahakala prayer

For any further teachings or explanation to the practice of the Protector please contact nearest Karma Kagyu buddhist centre.

Video Rating: 4 / 5



July 6: Celebrate Compassion Day — and the Dalai Lama

Via the FPMT.

July 6 will mark the 77th birthday of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, and to celebrate, the day has also been designated by the good folks at the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT) as "Compassion Day." As Michael Ium, Compassion Day coordinator for the FPMT explains:

Compassion Day arose out of three main desires: establishing a joint celebration for the FPMT North American community; honoring the birthday of His Holiness, and cultivating compassion through both internal and external practices. Our hope is that Compassion Day is a celebration of compassion in every aspect of our lives, and a way for us to connect and support each other. Our main objective is for individuals and dharma centers connected to the FPMT in North America to make Compassion Day a special celebration, whether that is through the creation of a gift for His Holiness, having group meditations, or offering community service. Of course, we would welcome involvement from any individuals or groups who also wish to honor His Holiness, or celebrate compassion in their own ways! Right now we are in the final planning stages, and hope to ramp up the momentum in the month leading up to July 6th.

There are three main aspects to Compassion Day: Rejoicing, Compassion in Action, and Meditation. For more on how to participate in the these, visit the Compassion Day website and/or the day's Facebook page.

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Safe word

Domestic relationships of all sorts might work a lot better by having a safeword in case an argument starts to hurt someone too much. To disrespect a safeword would be grounds to dissolve the relationship. It's got to be that serious. A safeword is sort of like a "block" at Occupy general assemblies. It means [...] Read More @ Source



I Can See Clearly Now!

clean_glasses1.jpg
Sometimes we see the bigger picture
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and sometimes it's just the glasses on the end of our nose!

This morning as I reached for my reading glasses I caught sight of the smears on the lenses. Usually I smooch the glass clean with a bit of my robe fabric, not taking the time to do a proper job. But today I went and washed my glasses with shower jell, which was to hand, and hey presto I can see clearly now!

But seeing clearly is a matter of perspective. Sometimes taking in the bigger picture and sometimes zoomed in close. What's in focus? Objects, over there and people over there are an obvious focus point. But what if, instead of gazing exclusively at objects, one takes in the space around. Negative space as it is termed. Not only around objects but between the object and ones own body? And between oneself and other selves. Somebody said the other day that it is the spaces between that unite not create division or distance.

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Zazen - A Guide to Sitting.

A brief explanation of zazen-often called sitting meditation. Filmed at the Kokusai Zendo in Kyoto, Japan. This clip is from The Zen Mind by EmptyMind Films. Produced & written by Jon Braeley.

Video Rating: 4 / 5



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